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Physicist, Startup Founder, Blogger, Dad

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Afghanistan is lost

Listen to this interview.

[In contrast to the Russians ...] "We thought because we had good intentions, and if we treated people nicely, we could succeed. After 10-11 years and so many civilian casualties, most accidental -- there's only so many times you can say 'sorry we killed your family, but we're here to help you'. We've passed that point a long time ago ..."
Journalist and documentary-maker Ben Anderson discusses the war in Afghanistan, and his experience reporting on front lines in Helmand province. His book No Worse Enemy: The Inside Story of the Chaotic Struggle for Afghanistan is based on five years of unrivalled access to the US Marines and UK Forces, often for months at a time and amidst the worst violence the conflict has seen. It details the daily struggles facing U.S. troops in Afghanistan, and raises urgent questions about our strategies in there.

2 comments:

Ken Condon said...

There have been a few films on this unmitigated fiasco. One called Here and Now by Michael Sheridan and a film called Restrepo by Sebastian Junger and Tim Hetherington. Add your linked film into the stew and you have got a very volatile witches brew concoction of a lost, misguided, and very expensive clusterphuck misadventure. 

cheap Flights to Mexico said...

What's supposed to happen, at the end of a quest? Cheers and accolades,
Josh knew; people throw their hats in the air, and you glow with pride
as they lift you to their shoulders. What else? Medals, speeches and a
great feast, and then a ballad about your exploits, and finally, as the
fireworks go off overhead, a soft, clean, fresh bed.

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